Miriam Ruiz
random thoughts on technology and life











{November 19, 2015}   Projects, Conflicts and Emotions

The Debian Project includes many people, groups and teams with different goals, priorities and ways of doing things. Diversity is a good thing, and the results of the continuous interaction, cooperation and competition among different points of view and components make up a successful developing framework both in Debian and in other Free / Libre / Open Source Software communities.

The cost of this evolutionary paradigm is that sometimes there are subprojects that might have been extremely successful and useful that are surpassed by newer approaches, or that have to compete with alternative approaches that were not there before, and which might pursue different goals or have a different way of doing things that their developers find preferable in terms of modularity, scalability, stability, maintenance, aesthetics or any other reason.

Whenever this happens, the emotional impact on the person or group of people that are behind the established component (or process, or organizational structure), that is being questioned and put under test by the newer approach can be important, particularly when they have invested a lot of time and effort and a considerable amount of emotional energy doing a great job for many years. Something they should be thanked for.

This might be particularly hard when -for whatever reason- the communication between both teams is not too fluent or constant, and sometimes the author or authors of the solution that was considered mainstream until then might feel left out and their territory stolen. As generally development teams and technical people in the Free / Libre / Open Source world are more focused on results than on relationships, projects are generally not too good at managing this (emotional, relational) situations, even though they (we) are gradually learning and improving.

What has happened with the Debian Live Project is indeed a hurtful situation, even though it’s probably an unavoidable one. The Debian Live Project has done a great job for many years and it is sad to see it dying abruptly. A new competing approach is on its way with a different set of priorities and different way of doing things, and all that can be done at the moment is to thank Daniel for all his work, as well as everyone who has made the Debian Live Project successful for so many years, also thank the people who are investing their time and effort in developing something that might be even better. Lets wait and see.

Source of the image: Conflict Modes and Managerial Styles by Ed Batista



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